Lakota Perspectives 

 

Paintings for Justice

        

       I am making available, two prints of my paintings, limited editions of 500.  Half of the proceeds will go to Bill Windsor and his fight for justice for all Americans who have suffered gross injustice at the hands of clever attorneys and corrupt judges.  He intends to make a documentary movie of the injustice in which I will tell Jami's story.  Please scroll down to view paintings and instructions on how you may obtain a print.

 FACTS
    
       In September of 2006, an Indian girl announced to me during 9th grade art class, that she had been raped, and that she tried to kill herself.  I reported this to Superintendent  and Principal.  Supt assured me I had done the right thing, and that he would handle it from there.

            His way of handling it was by staging a fight to justify expelling the rape and suicide victim, a girl on and IEP.   He then brought in another girl, Jami, to take the place of the rape victim.  He questioned Jami about being raped and told her and her parents that I had told them to do that. Later the superintendent said that Jamis had not been raped, that there were no rapes to report, and that I had made the whole thing up.  Superintendent and Principal began retaliating against me by manipulating my classes, causing discipline problems for me, and giving me low evaluation scores, eventually firing me and charging me with misconduct for failing to follow the cirriculum by teaching Native Americans their history and culture. (Slap your forehead!)

 When I discovered late December that the administrators had not reported the rape, I reported to proper authorities.I wrote a detailed report to every school board member, detailing how students were being manipulated, and that administrators had not reported a rape as required.  What I didn't realize at that time is that Supt. Guthrie has tampered with my report to read that I had said Jami had been raped.  The school board totally ignored my letter, and refused to meet with me. I sent a copy of the school board report to Social Services as a 960 report of the rape reported to me by MH, as I was required to do by law.  Astoninshingly, Social Services refused to investigate because the states attorney and sheriff said their was nothing to investigate.
           
   When the Supt. discovered I had reported, he immediately fired me on January 4, 2007.  Realizing he had just committed an illegal firing, apon his attorney's advice, he immediately called me back to teach, on the condition that I do not talk to Jami, do not talk to anyone about this, and follow his chain of command, in which he insisted I could not talk to the school board.

 Supt. Guthrie continued to retaliate against me with the help of his clever attorney, Gary Thune.  They involved the tribal chairwoman, Myra Pearson, who wrote a letter to the superintendent demanding that he remove me because I was teaching Lakota rather than Dakota.  (Slap your forehead!)
 

 I filed a Complaint with the ND Standards and Practices Board of Education, and wrote a letter to the sheriff.  When the Supt learned I had done this, he immediately called the school board for an emergency meeting for the sole purpose of firing me.  I was not notified of this meeting.  I was fired on April 11, 2007, before the end of my contract, and told not to return to my classroom.  ESPB dismissed my complaint without any investigation, due to the fact that lawyer Gary Thune had written a letter advising the Board that there was nothing to investigate.  ESPB then withheld the Responses from me for 2 years, until I subpoenaed the records.

 Clever lawyer Gary Thune rubbed his hands together when I filed for unemployment.  It was his golden opportunity to manipulate recreate a totally false version of the facts, based solely on employer information.    Clever lawyer Thune claimed that the Non-renewal hearing could substitute for the Dismissal hearing, and therefore, since I had chosen not to go to the Non-renewal hearing, he insisted I had waived my rights.  I claimed that I had only followed the law by reporting a rape, and that I had been fired without due process.  Job Service decided that I had committed misconduct by failing to follow chain of command.  Flabbergasted by Job Service's decision, and knowing that a great miscarriage of injustice had taken place, I appealed the Decision to the courts, not realizing that this was the devil's playground for lawyers and judges to memorialize their false facts, present false evidence, and tamper with witnesses.  Needless to say, I lost out all the way to the US Supreme Court. 

 I could not find any N.D. lawyer to take on a lawsuit.  ACLU, Legal Services, and individual lawyers all turned me down.  I could not find any authority to pursue the law against retaliation.  I could not find any authority to investigate the Administrator’s failure to report a rape and subsequent retaliation against me for having reported, not the sheriff, states attorney, attorney General, or even the N.D. State Department of Education.

 The rape victim was not allowed to return to school.  Later, summer of 07, she was assaulted and severely battered by the tribal president’s daughter, 29 years old, who beat the rape victim while her boyfriend smashed  a beer bottle over the 16 year old girl’s head.  I reported this to Social Services, the States Attorney, the sheriff, both senators,  the attorney general, and the FBI.  They all claimed there was nothing they could do about it because it happened on the Spirit Lake Reservation.  Apparently, officials do not have to investigate rape crimes if it happens on the reservation and if the rapist is related to a high ranking official.  Blame it on the teacher instead, which is exactly what they all did.

 Superintendent Charles Guthrie deliberately chose not to report the rape of a student, M H, when it became known to him,  and abused Jami by questioning Jami about a rape in violation of child abuse laws which prohibits any unauthorized questioning of students,  making the girl, Jami Jetty and her parents, believe that I had told school administrators that Jami had been raped,  which caused everyone to regard Jami as the rape victim which then made life intolerable for Jami, and was the reason why she killed herself, as told to me by her father, James Jetty in a conversation I had with him in February of 2011.  It all started from the fact that Social Services refused to investigate my 29 page Report of institutional abuse, as advised by states attorney James Wang.
 
 By doing my duty to repor a rape,  my teaching career has been ruined, and sexual abuse takes place as usual on the reservation, and the poor girls have to suffer in silence, scared for the rest of their lives. 

 I have recently turned over a 960 Report of a Child Fatality to the US Attorney.  If he doesn't accept it, I will contact the Senate Judiciary Committee and the US Department of Justice.  Either way, my story will be in Bill Windsor's documentary move along with a number of other stories of injustice.

LIMITED EDITION PRINTS AVAILABLE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sitting Bull’s Way of Life

Janis Schmidt, artist

Oil on canvas

Print size, 16” x 20”

$200

 

Sitting Bull is not only a great hero to Sioux Indians, both Lakota and Dakota, he is an icon to all Indian tribes.  He fought for his land, his people, and his way of life.  He had the charisma to organize the Indians tribes to defeat  the U.S. army at the battle of the Little Big Horn.  He refused to sign away any of his land.  When the U.S. Army was coming for the revenge of Custer,  Sitting Bull took his band to Canada, until he was forced to return to Dakota Territory.  He clung to his old ways, and the Pipe until he could fight no longer.  He refused to sell the Black Hills, so the government had him killed.  Because Commissioners were constantly coming to talk to Sitting Bull, many of his words were recorded.  Here are some of his words:

 

“Behold, the spring has come.

The earth has received the embraces of the sun.

Soon we shall see the results of that love.’

All of nature is awake and has a place in the sun.

Therefore, we yield to our neighbors,

Even our animal neighbors,

The same right to inhabit this land.

But now another race of people have come.

They build many things and leave behind much refuse. 

They make many laws which the rich may break,

But the poor may not. 

They are like a spring freshet

That overflows its banks.

We cannot contain them

But we do not sell our land, our Mother.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Traditional Dancers

 

Oil on Canvas

 

Print size,  9” x 12”

 

$100

 

 

 

Very little is left of the Indian ways.  The pow wows of today are a modern invention.  But it is the only opportunity Indians have to getting together with each other as they did many years ago.  Dancing has become a contest.  One of the categories is the traditional dance, where male dancers wear a bustle of eagle feathers.  Many tribes come together at this time at the bigger pow wows, and it is a good time for everyone.  These events are open to the public, and anyone can attend.

 

For more information, on purchasing these prints, please contact me at:

 

Janis Schmidt

 

418 Griffin St
.

Warwick, ND  58381

 

Phone  701-294-2196

Email  jlschmidt@gondtc.com

 

  

Sitting Bull’s Way of Life

 

Janis Schmidt, artist

Oil on canvas

Print size, 16” x 20”

$125

 

Sitting Bull is not only a great hero to Sioux Indians, both Lakota and Dakota, he is an icon to all Indian tribes.  He fought for his land, his people, and his way of life.  He had the charisma to organize the Indians tribes to defeat  the U.S. army at the battle of the Little Big Horn.  He refused to sign away any of his land.  When the U.S. Army was coming for the revenge of Custer,  Sitting Bull took his band to Canada , until he was forced to return to Dakota Territory .  He clung to his old ways, and the Pipe until he could fight no longer.  He refused to sell the Black Hills , so the government had him killed.  Because Commissioners were constantly coming to talk to Sitting Bull, many of his words were recorded.  Here are some of his words:

 

“Behold, the spring has come.

The earth has received the embraces of the sun.

Soon we shall see the results of that love.’

All of nature is awake and has a place in the sun.

Therefore, we yield to our neighbors,

Even our animal neighbors,

The same right to inhabit this land.

But now another race of people have come.

They build many things and leave behind much refuse. 

They make many laws which the rich ma break,

But the poor may not. 

They are like a spring freshet

That overflows its banks.

We cannot contain them

But we do not sell our land, our Mother.”

 

 

 

 

Traditional Dancers

 

Oil on Canvas

 

Print size,  9” x 12”

 

$35

 

 

Very little is left of the Indian ways.  The pow wows of today are a modern invention.  But it is the only opportunity Indians have to getting together with each other as they did many years ago.  Dancing has become a contest.  One of the categories is the traditional dance, where male dancers wear a bustle of eagle feathers.  Many tribes come together at this time at the bigger pow wows, and it is a good time for everyone.  These events are open to the public, and anyone can attend.

 

For more information, on purchasing these prints, please contact me at:

 

Janis Schmidt

418 Griffin St
.

 

 

Warwick, ND  58381

 

Phone  701-294-2196

Email  jlschmidt@gondtc.com

 

 

 

 

 

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